WHERE TO EAT AND SLEEP IN ABEL TASMAN NATIONAL PARK

ESPAÑOL

The first thing to keep in mind is that as in the whole country, free camping is not allowed in Abel Tasman.

ACCOMMODATION IN THE PARK IMMEDIATIONS

At both ends of the park, which are Marahau and Kaiteriteri to the south, and Pohara, Tarakohe and Tata Beach to the north, there are accommodations of all types and prices.

ACCOMMODATION IN THE COASTAL TRACK

In Anchorage Bay, Torrent Bay, Awaroa and Totaranui there are private homes, some of which are on AirBnb. It is likely that in a short time almost 100% of these houses are for rent, but for now our main option are huts and campsites:

  • You have to book on the official Great Walks website. Those who arrive without a reservation, or stop at one of those where they had not booked, will be charged a surcharge or asked to leave the park.
  • Characteristics:
    • All have potable rainwater tanks, although not treated, so it is advisable to bring means to purify it (pills, filters or boil it).
    • The toilets have rainwater cistern.
    • The huts have gas heating, but no electricity.
    • There are no showers.
    • In most there are no cooking facilities. It is not allowed to make fire but gas stoves are.
    • They do not provide food.
    • Hammocks are not allowed to be hanged, since most trees are weak to support them.
  • Prices:
    • High season (October 1 to April 30), a maximum of 2 nights is allowed in the same place, except Totaranui that only allows one night:
      • Huts:
        • New Zealanders or resident foreigners: NZ $ 38 adult, under 17 free, but must also have a reservation.
        • International visitors: NZ $ 75, both adults and children.
      • Camps:
        • New Zealanders or resident foreigners: NZ $ 15 adult, under 17 free, but must also have a reservation.
        • International visitors: NZ $ 30, both adults and children.
    • Low season (May 1 to September 30), a maximum of 5 nights is allowed in the same place; There is no difference in price between native and foreign:
      • Huts: 32 NZ $ adult, under 17 free, but must also have a reservation.
      • Camps: 15 NZ $ adult, under 17 years free, but must also have a reservation.

Other accommodation options in Coastal Track:

  • In Anchorage Bay a ship converted into a hostel is permanently anchored, the Aquapackers.
  • In Torrent Bay is Torrent Bay Wilsons Lodge, a great and very expensive accommodation.
  • The only other accommodation is the Awaroa Lodge, for those who want to pamper halfway.
  • There are some, just two or three AirBnb accommodations in Torrent Bay and Awaroa.

ACCOMMODATION IN INLAND TRACK

There are 3 huts on the route and two shelters:

  • Unlike those of the Coastal,these are free and do not require a reservation, they are assigned first come first served. They are Awapoto with 12 bunks, Wainui with 4 bunks and Castle Rock with 8 bunks.
  • They have latrines and untreated drinking water, heating by wood stoves and of course there is no electricity.
  • There are no campsites en route, unless we turn halfway to Canaan, but if the huts were full, rangers are likely to be comprehensive if we are forced to camp by the hut.

WHERE TO EAT AND BUY FOOD IN ABEL TASMAN NATIONAL PARK

Inside the park there is nowhere to buy food except for the three options mentioned in the previous paragraph: the Awaroa Lodge that has a cafeteria, but no food shop, the Aquapackers that offers breakfast and the Wilsons Lodge that includes meals to guests.

  • In Marahau and Kaiteriteri there are several restaurants, cafes and some minimarkets, but to stock up for the routes there are better supermarkets in Motueka, the town immediately to the south. Another option is to bring all our food from Nelson.
  • In the north we will find what is necessary in Tarakohe.

Both in the huts and in the camps there are drinking water tanks that can be drunk without problems. Although it is advisable to carry a filter, water purification tablets or boil the water, the usual users of the route comment that it is not necessary.

SITUATION, PRICES AND PERMITS

WEATHER AND WHEN TO GO

WHAT TO PACK

TRANSPORT

∇ Destinations / ∇ Oceania / ∇ New Zealand / ∇ South Island Sur / ∇ Abel Tasman National Park

Big hug to those by that time young and intrepid backpackers we used to be in Nelson

9 thoughts on “WHERE TO EAT AND SLEEP IN ABEL TASMAN NATIONAL PARK

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  3. Pingback: TRANSPORTATION IN ABEL TASMAN NATIONAL PARK – Al Was Here

  4. Pingback: ABEL TASMAN COASTAL TRACK – Al Was Here

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  9. Pingback: ABEL TASMAN NATIONAL PARK: WEATHER AND WHEN TO GO – Al Was Here

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